News

  • Scientists just invented a silicone “second skin” that makes you look younger

    09 May 2016 | Popular Mechanics
    A team of chemical engineers and medical researchers led by Robert Langer at MIT just developed a wearable second skin. It's a breathable, silicone-based film that's effectively invisible to the human eye. Called XPL (for crosslinked polymer layer) the film is durable and elastic yet fits taut to the skin, with a pressure that reduces the appearance of wrinkles when applied.
  • Silicone ring may be superior to drops for glaucoma patients

    05 May 2016 | UPI
    A timed-release drug-eluting ring placed in the eye reduced patients' glaucoma symptoms in a clinical trial, researchers report. The ring, called Helios, was shown to reduce eye pressure during six-month trials, in comparison to standard drops used for glaucoma, suggesting a more reliable treatment that is easier for patients to use and doctors to monitor.
  • Stepless control devices with flexible pressure sensors

    26 April 2016 | Phys Org
    Researchers at Fraunhofer have recently created sensors made from silicone, making it easier to steplessly control devices. Researchers are presenting a glove that can measure pressure and a steering wheel that lets the driver control music, light and ventilation at the touch of a finger.
  • A new combination of materials allows state-of-the-art operating controls with elastic circuits

    15 April 2016 | Science Daily
    Research scientists have succeeded in manufacturing circuit paths on thin, elastic foil made of silicone. Since these are relatively insensitive to compression and elongation strain, the electrical circuits can adapt to the curvature of appliances, potentially paving the way for touch sensitive displays on household and electrical appliances.
  • Silicone Films Could Lead to Artificial Muscles

    07 April 2016 | Controlled Environments
    Researchers of the University of Basel and Empa have gotten a step closer to engineering artificial muscles: they have developed a method to generate nanometer-thin silicone films.
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